How are Africa's most innovative tech products are developed?
in partnership with FLUTTERWAVE 10.07.2020
Hi there, Welcome to TC Daily! In today's digest: Nigerian bike hailing service, MAX says it is on course to grow 10x in despite motorcycle ban in Lagos; Zambian fintech Lupiya raises $1 million funding; and Japanese VC Samurai Incubate invests in Eden Life. Please take a moment to subscribe to our newsletter if this email was forwarded to you.
PARTNER CONTENT

Medplus - A wholesale & retail pharmacy that not only sells locally manufactured & imported drugs but also your everyday essentials. Now you can order your COVID-19 essentials & have it delivered to you in one click.

BIKE HAILING
It is now six months since bike hailing was restricted in Nigeria’s biggest city, Lagos. Mobility companies such as Gokada quickly pivoted to deliveries to survive. But MAX, the pioneer of bike hailing in Nigeria, deliveries was always part of their services. In Lagos, the company said it has seen a 100% growth in its delivery services. As the companies bike hailing business enjoyed growth in 2019, MAX expanded to a few other cities including important locations like Kano and Ibadan. In hindsight, that expansion strategy paid off and has helped MAX thrive despite the restrictions in Lagos. In an interview with TechCabal, Adetayo Bamiduro, MAX’s CEO said the company is on course for 10x growth outside Lagos by the end of 2020.
E-COMMERCE

Nigerian e-commerce platform, Pricepally, has raised an undisclosed round of funding from GreenTec Capital, the German-based firm. Launched in November 2019, Pricepally is a group-buying groceries platform. It removes the middle man from the supply chain, connects consumers directly to farmers and wholesalers. With the new funding, the company says it will expand operations beyond Lagos, Nigeria’s biggest market

FUNDING

Zambian fintech startup, Lupiya has raised $1 million funding to scale up its digital lending solution in the country. The funding came from Engyma Ventures, a $6.8 million impact investing fund focused on Southern Africa. A stable landlocked democratic country, financial inclusion is an important topic in Zambia. Although much of its population live in urban areas, only 59.3% of the country’s adult population are financially included, while 70% lack access to collateral for loans. Lupiya believes its solution can solve these and draw more people into the inclusive net.

TECHCABAL LIVE
Our next TechCabal Live session holds on today, Friday, July 10 at 11 am and this time we are having Omowale David-Ashiru, Vice President - Global Operations at Andela. The global tech talent provider recently pivoted to a fully remote model and has had to make tough decisions in the middle of the pandemic. Omowale's team is responsible for creating an environment that fosters effective work for its fully remote workforce across seven countries with unit economics that is viable for sustained growth and scaling of the company. She will answer questions about how Andela is navigating the crisis and will share lessons for business leaders. Register here to join the session.
TECHCABAL: THE BACKEND
From ideation to execution, every company develops innovative products differently. With a new article series called TechCabal: The BackEnd, we take you into the mind of those who conceived, designed and built the product, highlighting product uniqueness, user behaviour assumptions and challenges during the product cycle. For our first BackEnd review, TechCabal’s Alexander Onukwue wrote about SendCash, an online platform for direct Bitcoin remittances to Nigerian bank accounts.
EDUCATION IN NIGERIA
The pandemic and the absence of a cure has disrupted the academic calendar of most schools. Very few universities and secondary schools have switched to online learning. The others are still waiting for the government to issue a resumption date. However, pandemic cases have not slowed down in the country as confirmed cases have now crossed 30,000. In fact, Nigeria has bungled its COVID-19 response measures. On one hand, important short-term measures to guide the education sector, the financial sector and the rest of the economy, are absent. The government continues to move headstrong with little fiscal measures to support businesses and individuals affected by the pandemic. On the other hand, there is also an apparent lack of coordination within the government that will affect the education sector. On July 6, Chukwuemeka Nwajiuba, Nigeria’s junior Minister of Education, announced the reopening of secondary and primary schools on July 13 for graduating students to write their scheduled external examinations. That announcement was made at the daily briefing of Presidential Task Force on COVID-19 and approved by the president. But on July 8, the senior Minister for Education, Adamu Adamu, said schools would not be reopened. "Schools will remain closed," he said. "We will not open schools soon for examination or for any reason unless it is safe for our children, even WAEC." Meanwhile, as schools remain shut, the government has made minimal efforts to provide alternative learning resources. There have been multiple announcements and online learning has also been mooted including zero-rated internet access to educational resources. But nothing concrete from the government yet. Historic infrastructural challenges like electricity and low income mean the role of the government is crucial now. The National Information Technology Development Agency (NITDA) was expected to coordinate a tech-driven response to support the country during the pandemic. It has made little progress since April. A number of schools are deciding they can’t wait for the government. A few universities have developed their own e-learning systems and are using Zoom, Telegram and WhatsApp to coordinate classes. Some secondary schools are also attempting to develop their own e-learning platforms as they prepare for a possible shutdown for the rest of the year.
OPPORTUNITY
Applications are open from blockchain startups for the $100,000 UNICEF Innovation Fund. The fund is looking to invest in companies developing blockchain-based innovations and distributed ledger tech. Applications are open till July 26.
INVESTMENT

Japan-based investment firm, Samurai Incubate Africa has invested in Eden Life, the Nigerian room service. This is Samurai’s first investment from its second fund, the Samurai Africa 2nd General Partnership. Over the last two years, Samurai Incubate has invested in 21 startups, backing companies like Wallets.Africa and Bamboo.

WHAT ELSE IS HAPPENING?
Thanks for reading,

We'll be back next week.
- Abubakar

Share TC Daily with your friends!

Copyright © 2020 Big Cabal Media,
All rights reserved.
You are receiving this email because
you signed up on TechCabal.com
Our mailing address is:
Big Cabal Media
18, Nnobi Street, Animashaun, Surulere, Lagos
Surulere 100001
Nigeria
Add us to your address book
Want to change how you receive these emails? You can
update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.
Email Marketing by ActiveCampaign
TechCabal is a Big Cabal Media brand



Copyright © 2020
All rights reserved

Privacy & Terms
X